According to the recent article on the GCreport.com, innovations in technology usually invite innovations in hacking. Luckily, the inverse is true as well: As public concern regarding the potential pitfalls of all things being related to the internet is continuing to grow, experts of IT are beginning to take the security of IoT (Internet of Things) much more seriously.

The IoT has generated new vulnerabilities for cybercriminals to exploit. According to an article that was written earlier this year, the futuristic Jason Hope was expressing his concerns regarding the security threats that posed by some of the IoT devices.

Hope said that sensitive information that is combined with an infrastructure that is weak makes the Internet of Things devices very tempting for hackers. Hope further elaborated that the small internet connected devices usually have a low computing power, which makes them extremely weak to support an encryption that is advanced.

Hope is a specialist in analyzing the advancements in technology-driven economic trends. As security breach reports of major companies are continuing to make headlines, Hope is predicting that consumers are going to start demanding better IT (information technology) security from their electronics.

Smart thermostats, smart refrigerators, plus other devices with Wi-Fi connectivity could open doorways into the networks. Syncing Internet of Things devices with a home computer, a smartphone, or a laptop put any personal information that is stored on those devices at risk. Some IoT devices such as security cameras and fitness trackers could be exploited to spy or stalk users. Unfortunately, devices designed to keep us healthy and safe could be turned against us.

Companies for software and hardware have a responsibility of making sure that the data of their users are safe. When users trust a company with any of their personal information, the consumers have a legitimate expectation that their privacy is going to be protected.

But, there are measures that people could take to make sure that they have protected themselves. For instance, configuring all networks so that every network has an identifying signature that is unique. That way administrators are going to be notified whenever a computer that’s unknown tries connecting. A smart firewall like CUJO could provide an additional security layer for users using IoT devices.

About Jason Hope

Hope grew up in the city in Maricopa County called Tempe, in Arizona state, in the U.S. He attended Arizona State University, where he earned his degree in finance. He also attended Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business, where he received an MBA. Hope pledged $500,000 to the SENS Foundation. His donation was for supporting the research of SENS Foundation for rejuvenation biotechnologies as well as its Mission on fighting age-related disease.